Information

Dent DD- 116 - History


Dent

John H. Dent, born in Maryland in 1782, was appointed a Midshipman 16 March 1798. He served in Constellation when she captured the French frigate Insurgent on 1 February 1799, and after serving in Constitution in the Mediterranean, commanded the schooners Nautilus and Scourge during the Tripolitan War, taking part in the attacks on Tripoli in 1805. He was in command of Hornet from 1806 to 1808. Captain Dent died in St. Bartholomew's Parish, Md., 31 July 1823.

(DD-116: dp. 1,090; 1. 314'5"; b. 31'8", dr. 8'8"; s. 35 k.; cpl. 100; a. 4 4", 12 21" tt.; cl. Rathburne)

Dent (DD-116) was launched 23 March 1918 by William Cramp and Sons, Philadelphia, Pa.; sponsored by Miss A. W. Collins, great-granddaughter of Captain Dent; and commissioned 9 September 1918, Commander B, C. Allen in command.

Dent escorted a convoy to Ireland between 19 September and 8 November 1918, then carried out training at Guantanamo Bay. On 1 May 1919 she got underway from New York to serve on station off Trepassey Harbor, Newfoundland, during the historic first aerial crossing of the Atlantic, a feat accomplished by a Navy seaplane. She returned to Newport on the 24th, and on 20 June she joined the escort for the yacht Imperator, carrying the President of Brazil from New York to Newport.

Dent arrived at San Pedro, Calif., 6 August 1919 to join the Pacific Fleet. She cruised to Hawaii as escort for New York (BB 34) with the Secretary of the Navy embarked in August, then steamed to Seattle for a Fleet Review in September. She returned to San Diego 22 September and went into reserve. She was placed in active commission again 14 December 1920 and operated with 50 percent of her complement on gunnery and torpedo practice, and in fleet maneuvers. She made a cruise to South America from 7 January to 11 March 1921, visiting Valparaiso, Chile, Costa Rica and various ports in Mexico. Dent was placed out of commission in reserve 7 June 1922.

Recommissioned 15 May 1930 Dent acted as plane guard for carrier operations, trained reservists, and sailed for a fleet problem in the Caribbean and a visit to the east coast from April to November 1934. On 18 December she entered the Rotating Reserve at San Diego and tested ordnance until returning to active commission 10 June 1935. Dent operated along the West Coast and in the Hawaiian Islands until the United States entered World War II. At San Diego on 7 December 1941, she got underway the next day to screen Saratoga (CV-3) in her high speed run to Pearl Harbor.

Returning to San Francisco 29 December 1941 Dent had duty with the Sound School at San Diego and operated along the west coast on convoy duty until 27 April 1942 when she sailed for Alaskan waters. From 8 May she operated out of Dutch Harbor on convoy and patrol duty, escorting transports for the invasion of Adak 1 September. She returned to Seattle 30 January 1943 for repairs and conversion to a high-speed transport. She was reclassified APD-9, 7 March 1943.

Dent arrived at Noumea, New Caledonia 20 April 1943. She operated from this base and Espiritu Santo landing troops in the assaults on New Georgia, Rendova, Vella Lavella, ant Cape Torokina, Bougainville After overhaul at Sydney, Australia, in November, she returned to Milne Bay, New Guinea on 17 December. While training at Cape Sudest 5 days later, she grounded on an uncharted shoal. Serious structural damage necessitated her return to Australia for repairs l through January 1944.

Dent arrived at Noumea 7 February 1944 and landed men of the 4th Marines on Emirau Island 20 March. From Milne Bay, New Guinea, she carried soldiers to the Aitape landings 22 April. Sailing from New Guinea 9 May, she returned to the Solomons to train an underwater demolition team for the invasion of the Marianas. She carried her team to Roi where they were transferred for transportation to Guam, then escorted Maxama (AE-9) to Saipan to carry emergency supplies of ammunition to the bombardment ships Dent patrolled off Saipan and Tinian until early July when she escorted transports to Eniwetok and sailed for overhaul at San Diego, arriving 3 August.

From 8 November 1944 until the end of the war Dent served with the Amphibious Training Force, Pacific Fleet, at San Diego. She sailed 20 October 1945 for the east coast, arriving at Philadelphia, Pa., 6 November. Dent was decommissioned there 4 December 1945 and sold 13 June 1946.

Dent received five battle stars for World War II service.


Dent DD- 116 - History

In the Pacific, the first destroyers to carry echo-ranging equipment were DesDiv 19&rsquos Rathburne, Waters, Talbot and Dent while graduates of the first sonar class at New London were assigned to destroyers Du Pont, Bernadou, Ellis and Cole.

Memorial Wall plaque
National Museum of the Pacific War,
Fredericksburg, Texas.

In the spring of 1941, Atlantic Fleet (DesLant) destroyers were engaged in &ldquoshort-of-war&rdquo operations. On 1 March, in preparing for convoy escort duties, the Navy organized a Northeastern Escort Support Force of destroyers, aircraft and support vessels. Three squadrons of destroyers were assigned: DesRon 7, made up entirely of Benson- and Gleaves-class destroyers, and DesRons 30 and 31, all flush deckers.

On 27 May, the same day that British forces sank battleship Bismarck, President Roosevelt declared an &ldquoUnlimited National Emergency&rdquo and extended the patrol into North and South Atlantic waters. On 15 July, bleak Argentia, Newfoundland was commissioned as base for the Support Force, from which patrols ranged as far east as 30 W.

On 1 July, the first American Naval Task Force organized for foreign service stood out from Argentia, escorting Marines to relieve the British garrison in Iceland. Leading the way in the outer screen were DesDiv 60&rsquos Ellis, Bernadou, Upshur and Lea, with Sims-class Buck.

Following the United States&rsquo entry into World War II at the end of the year, DesRon 30 destroyers continued operations in the Atlantic. Later in the year, Bernadou, Cole and Dallas were modified for special operations during the invasion of North Africa in November 1942. All three survived, and received the Presidential Unit Citation for their actions.


Dent escorted a convoy to Ireland between 19 September and 8 November 1918, then carried out training at Guantánamo Bay. On 1 May 1919 she got underway from New York to serve on station off Trepassey Harbor, Newfoundland, during the historic first aerial crossing of the Atlantic, a feat accomplished by a Navy seaplane. She returned to Newport on the 24th, and on 20 June she joined the escort for the yacht Imperator, carrying the President of Brazil from New York to Newport.

Dent arrived at San Pedro, Calif., 6 August 1919 to join the Pacific Fleet. She cruised to Hawaii as escort for New York (BB-34) with the Secretary of the Navy embarked in August, then steamed to Seattle for a Fleet Review in September. She returned to San Diego 22 September and went into reserve. She was placed in active commission again 14 December 1920 and operated with 50 percent of her complement on gunnery and torpedo practice, and in fleet maneuvers. She made a cruise to South America from 7 January to 11 March 1921, visiting Valparaiso, Chile Costa Rica and various ports in Mexico. Dent was placed out of commission in reserve 7 June 1922.

Recommissioned 15 May 1930 Dent acted as plane guard for carrier operations, trained reservists, and sailed for a fleet problem in the Caribbean and a visit to the east coast from April to November 1934. On 18 December she entered the Rotating Reserve at San Diego and tested ordnance until returning to active commission 10 June 1935. Dent operated along the West Coast and in the Hawaiian Islands until the United States entered World War II. At San Diego on 7 December 1941, she got underway the next day to screen Saratoga (CV-3) in her high speed run to Pearl Harbor.

Returning to San Francisco 29 December 1941, Dent had duty with the Sound School at San Diego and operated along the west coast on convoy duty until 27 April 1942 when she sailed for Alaskan waters. From 8 May she operated out of Dutch Harbor on convoy and patrol duty, escorting transports for the invasion of Adak 1 September. She returned to Seattle 30 January 1943 for repairs and conversion to a high-speed transport. She was reclassified APD-9, 7 March 1943.

Dent arrived at Noumea, New Caledonia 20 April 1943. She operated from this base and Espiritu Santo landing troops in the assaults on New Georgia, Rendova, Vella Lavella, and Cape Torokina, Bougainville. After overhaul at Sydney, Australia, in November, she returned to Milne Bay, New Guinea on 17 December. While training at Cape Sudest 5 days later, she grounded on an uncharted shoal. Serious structural damage necessitated her return to Australia for repairs through January 1944.

Dent arrived at Noumea 7 February 1944 and landed men of the 4th Marines on Emirau Island 20 March. From Milne Bay, New Guinea, she carried soldiers to the Aitape landings 22 April. Sailing from New Guinea 9 May, she returned to the Solomons to train an underwater demolition team for the invasion of the Marianas. She carried her team to Roi where they were transferred for transportation to Guam, then escorted Mazama (AE-9) to Saipan to carry emergency supplies of ammunition to the bombardment ships. Dent patrolled off Saipan and Tinian until early July when she escorted transports to Eniwetok and sailed for overhaul at San Diego, arriving 3 August.

From 8 November 1944 until the end of the war Dent served with the Amphibious Training Force, Pacific Fleet, at San Diego. She sailed 20 October 1945 for the east coast, arriving at Philadelphia, Pa., 6 November. Dent was decommissioned there 4 December 1945 and sold 13 June 1946.


Dent DD- 116 - History

A Tin Can Sailors
Destroyer History

DD-362 was named for Rear Admiral William Adger Moffet, the Chief of the Bureau of Aeronautics who lost his life in the crash of the huge Naval Airship AKRON (ZRS-4) on April 4, 1933.

USS MOFFETT became almost immediately involved in the growing crisis in Europe in the late 1930s. She joined the South Atlantic Neutrality Patrol in the spring of 1941, tasked with maintaining the peace off the coast of Brazil. She checkmated a move by a pro-Nazi French admiral to mount hostile actions in the Caribbean from the French Navy's base at Martinique after German forces had forced the surrender of France in 1940. Briefly leaving her tasks on the Neutrality Patrol, she escorted President F. D. Roosevelt to his historic meeting with Prime Minister Winston Churchill in Placentia Bay, Newfoundland. The historic meetings led to the framing of the Atlantic Charter and cemented an alliance that won World War II.

DD-362 spent the early war years as a convoy escort, protecting shipping between the Caribbean and ports along the West African coast. On May 17, 1943, USS MOFFETT, operating with USS JOUETT (DD-396) copied a report that Navy patrol aircraft had fired on a surfaced German submarine. The big flotilla leader sighted the U-boat just after midnight. With accurate fire from their 5-inch weapons, the destroyer team sank the submarine and later rescued fifty of the U-boat's crew.

On another escort assignment three months later, USS MOFFETT found herself protecting the cruiser USS MEMPHIS (CL-13) and a merchant vessel enroute to Ascension, the British island colony west of Africa. DD-362 established contact with an enemy submarine, which turned out to be the U-604, one of the most effective raider types launched by the Nazis. With the help of naval aircraft, the flotilla leader began a running battle with the U-boat that lasted almost a week and stretched across the South Atlantic and into the Caribbean. North of Trinidad, the sub surfaced, only to be driven down by MOFFETT's gunfire three days later, again with naval air in support, DD-362 reestablished contact and badly damaged the sub with a punishing depth charge attack. The Nazis had had enough on August 11, the U-boat skipper scuttled his vessel. MOFFETT received the well-deserved credit for the kill.

DD-362 spent the remainder of her career escorting convoys to European and North African ports. Enroute to Bizerte in August, MOFFETT's convoy was attacked by German torpedo planes. The veteran destroyer succeeded in laying a smoke screen to protect the merchantmen while she skillfully evaded repeated attacks by the aircraft. In frustration, the Germans broke off the attack.

In April 1945, DD-362 returned to Boston for a much-needed overhaul. Later towed to Charleston, the big destroyer found herself in the yard when the Japanese surrendered, ending the war. Work on her refit was stopped, and USS MOFFETT was decommissioned on November 2, 1945. She was sold for scrapping on May 16, 1947.


USS Rathburne (DD 113)

Decommissioned at San Diego 12 February 1923
Recommissioned 8 February 1930
Reclassified high speed transport APD-25 on 20 May 1944
Reclassified back to DD-113 on 20 July 1945
Decommissioned at Philadelphia 2 November 1945
Stricken 28 November 1945
Sold 21 November 1946 and broken up for scrap.

Commands listed for USS Rathburne (DD 113)

Please note that we're still working on this section.

CommanderFromTo
1Lt.Cdr. Preston Virginius Mercer, USN30 Jun 19397 Mar 1940
2Carl Gilford Christie, USN7 Mar 19407 Apr 1940
3Lt.Cdr. Preston Virginius Mercer, USN7 Apr 194010 Jun 1941
4Lt.Cdr. Roger Brown Nickerson, USN10 Jun 194125 Jun 1942
5T/Lt.Cdr. Corben Clark Shute, USN25 Jun 194217 Jul 1943
6Frank Lewis Fullaway, USNR17 Jul 194320 Jul 1944
7Richard Louis Welch, USNR20 Jul 194424 Sep 1945
8Lewis James Garfield, USNR24 Sep 19452 Nov 1945

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Click here to Submit events/comments/updates for this vessel.
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Notable events involving Rathburne include:

As part of DesDiv 20, she was among the first Destroyers to be fitted with Echo-Ranging Sonar equipment. ( 1 )

27 Nov 1918
Last convoy to New York completed. Remained in New York until January, 1919. ( 1 )

25 Apr 1944
Arrived at Puget Sound Navy yard to undergo conversion to High Speed Transport (APD, Calhoun class) ( 1 )

12 Aug 1944
As APD-25, the Rathburne left Hawaii sailing for the Solomons, UTD-10 aboard, with Commander Richard L. Welch in command. ( 1 )

12 Sep 1944
With TG-32.5, the Rathburne arrived in the Palau area for the Peleliu, Angaur per-invasion. On Sept. 14, off Angaur island, de-barked UTD-10 to clear Red beach, and provided fire support. ( 1 )

21 Sep 1944
Arrived off Ulithi, debarked UDT-10 to recon Falalop and Asor beaches ( 1 )

19 Oct 1944
Off Leyte, debarked UDT-10 to recon. Red beach, northern assault area. Provided covering fire. Then on 20, October covered the main landings with fire support off Dulag beaches. ( 1 )

6 Jan 1945
Entered Lingayen Gulf, Luzon screening Larger ships during shore bombardment. Jan. 7th, 1945, debarked UDT-10 to recon. Blue beach, provided covering fire. ( 1 )

29 Jan 1945
Arrived near San Nareiso, Zambales, Philippines. Debarked UDT-10, no opposition. ( 1 )

22 Mar 1945
Departed the Bonin-Volcano area (Iwo Jima) carrying POW's to Guam. ( 1 )

18 Apr 1945
Escorted LST Group 91 to Okinawa, arriving at Kerama Retto on the 18th of April. ( 1 )

27 Apr 1945
On patrol off Hagushi, Okinawa, was hit by a Kamikaze on the port bow just above thhe waterline. The planes engine and bomb traveled through the ship and exited the Starboard bow just below the waterline. Fire and flood control efforts saved the ship, which then made for Kerama Retto for temporary repairs. ( 1 )

18 Jun 1945
USS Rathburne, APD-25 arrived in San Diego California for repairs and re-conversion back to a destroyer. ( 1 )

Media links


U.S.S. PHELPS

USS Phelps received its name in honor of Rear Admiral Thomas Stowell Phelps. The Navy brought her into service upon her commission in February 1936. After shakedown, the ship reported to the Pacific where she remained for several years. The ship was in port at Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, when the Japanese attacked. She received no damage and was able to bring down at least one enemy plane. Early 1942 saw her working with the USS Saratoga during the Battle of the Coral Sea. She also took part in the Battle of Midway.

USS Phelps helped with the invasions of Guadalcanal and Tulagi in August 1942. In May 1943, the ship participated in the retaking of Attu and Kiska in the Aleutian chain. Moving to the south, she provided screening during the invasions of Makin Island, the Gilberts, Kwajalein, the Marshalls, and Saipan. During the Saipan campaign, the ship received damage from Japanese coastal artillery. She transferred to Atlantic operations after this. After a retrofit, she completed the war by providing escort between the US and the Mediterranean Sea. The Navy decommissioned her in November 1945 and sold her scrap in August 1947. She earned twelve battle stars during her service.


Mục lục

Dent được đặt lườn vào ngày 30 tháng 8 năm 1917 tại xưởng tàu của hãng William Cramp and Sons ở Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Nó được hạ thủy vào ngày 23 tháng 3 năm 1918, được đỡ đầu bởi cô A. W. Collins, và được đưa ra hoạt động vào ngày 9 tháng 9 năm 1918 dưới quyền chỉ huy của Hạm trưởng, Trung tá Hải quân B. C. Allen.

Những năm giữa hai cuộc thế chiến Sửa đổi

Dent hộ tống một đoàn tàu vận tải đi Ireland từ ngày 19 tháng 9 đến ngày 8 tháng 11 năm 1918, rồi tiến hành huấn luyện tại vịnh Guatánamo, Cuba. Vào ngày 1 tháng 5 năm 1919, nó khởi hành từ New York để phục vụ như cột mốc dẫn đường ngoài khơi cảng Trepassey, Newfoundland cho chuyến bay lịch sử vượt Đại Tây Dương của chiếc thủy phi cơ Hải quân NC-4. Nó quay trở về Newport vào ngày 24 tháng 5, và đến ngày 20 tháng 6 đã tham gia đoàn hộ tống cho chiếc tàu buồm đưa Tổng thống Brasil từ New York đến Newport.

Dent đi đến San Pedro, California vào ngày 6 tháng 8 năm 1919 để gia nhập Hạm đội Thái Bình Dương. Nó đã hộ tống thiết giáp hạm New York đưa Bộ trưởng Hải quân đi đến quần đảo Hawaii vào tháng 8, rồi đi đến Seattle tham gia một cuộc Duyệt binh Hải quân vào tháng 9. Nó quay trở về San Diego vào ngày 22 tháng 9 và được đưa vào thành phần dự bị, nhưng được cho hoạt động thường trực trở lại vào ngày 14 tháng 12 năm 1920 với một nửa biên chế nhân sự cho các hoạt động thực hành tác xạ và ngư lôi cũng như cơ động hạm đội. Chiếc tàu khu trục thực hiện một chuyến đi đến Nam Mỹ từ ngày 7 tháng 1 đến ngày 11 tháng 3 năm 1921, viếng thăm Valparaíso, Chile Costa Rica cùng nhiều cảng México. Dent được cho xuất biên chế và đưa về Hạm đội Dự bị vào ngày 7 tháng 6 năm 1922.

Dent được cho nhập biên chế trở lại vào ngày 15 tháng 5 năm 1930 và hoạt động như tàu hộ tống cho tàu sân bay, huấn luyện quân nhân dự bị tham gia một cuộc tập trận hạm đội tại vùng biển Caribe và viếng thăm vùng bờ Đông Hoa Kỳ từ tháng 4 đến tháng 11 năm 1934. Vào ngày 18 tháng 12, nó gia nhập lực lượng dự bị luân phiên tại San Diego, làm nhiệm vụ thử nghiệm đạn dược cho đến khi quay trở lại hoạt động thường trực vào ngày 10 tháng 6 năm 1935. Dent hoạt động dọc theo bờ Tây Hoa Kỳ và tại vùng quần đảo Hawaii cho đến khi Chiến tranh Thế giới thứ hai lan đến Thái Bình Dương do Nhật Bản tấn công Trân Châu Cảng. Có mặt tại San Diego vào ngày 7 tháng 12 năm 1941, nó lên đường vào ngày hôm sau hộ tống cho tàu sân bay Saratoga đang vội vã đi đến Trân Châu Cảng.

Thế Chiến II Sửa đổi

Quay trở về San Francisco vào ngày 29 tháng 12 năm 1941, Dent hoạt động cùng Trường dò âm dưới nước San Diego và hoạt động dọc theo bờ Tây trong nhiệm vụ hộ tống vận tải cho đến ngày 27 tháng 4 năm 1942, khi nó lên đường đi đến vùng biển Alaska. Từ ngày 8 tháng 5, nó hoạt động ngoài khơi Dutch Harbor cho nhiệm vụ tuần tra và hộ tống vận tải, hộ tống các tàu vận tải cho việc chiếm đóng đảo Adak vào ngày 1 tháng 9. Nó quay trở về Seattle vào ngày 30 tháng 1 năm 1943 để sửa chữa đồng thời cải biến thành một tàu vận chuyển cao tốc. Dent được xếp lại lớp với ký hiệu lườn mới APD-9 vào ngày 7 tháng 3 năm 1943.

Dent đi đến Noumea, Nouvelle-Calédonie vào ngày 20 tháng 4 năm 1943, rồi hoạt động từ căn cứ này và Espiritu Santo trong nhiệm vụ đổ bộ binh lính chiếm đóng New Georgia, Rendova, Vella Lavella và mũi Torokina, Bougainville. Sau khi được đại tu tại Sydney, Australia vào tháng 11, nó quay trở lại vịnh Milne, New Guinea vào ngày 17 tháng 12. Đang khi tiến hành huấn luyện tại mũi Sudest năm ngày sau đó, nó va phải một dãi đá ngầm không thể hiện trên hải đồ. Sự hư hỏng đáng kể cấu trúc lườn tàu buộc nó phải quay về Australia để sửa chữa suốt tháng 1 năm 1944.

Dent đi đến Noumea vào ngày 7 tháng 2 năm 1944, và cho đổ bộ lực lượng Sư đoàn 4 Thủy quân Lục chiến lên đảo Emirau vào ngày 20 tháng 3. Từ vịnh Milne, nó chuyển binh lính để đổ bộ lên Aitape vào ngày 22 tháng 4. Khởi hành từ New Guinea vào ngày 9 tháng 5, nó quay lại khu vực quần đảo Solomon để huấn luyện một đội phá hoại dưới nước (UDT) chuẩn bị cho việc chiếm đóng quần đảo Mariana. Nó đưa đội UDT đến Roi, nơi họ được tiếp tục vận chuyển đến Guam, rồi hộ tống cho chiếc Mazama đi đến Saipan chở hàng tiếp liệu khẩn cấp gồm đạn dược cho các tàu hoả lực bắn phá. Dent tuần tra ngoài khơi Saipan và Tinian cho đến đầu tháng 7, khi nó hộ tống các tàu vận chuyển đi đến Eniwetok, rồi lên đường quay về San Diego để đại tu, đến nơi vào ngày 3 tháng 8.

Từ ngày 8 tháng 11 năm 1944 cho đến khi chiến tranh kết thúc, Dent phục vụ cùng Lực lượng Huấn luyện Đổ bộ trực thuộc Hạm đội Thái Bình Dương tại San Diego. Nó lên đường vào ngày 20 tháng 10 năm 1945 để đi sang vùng bờ Đông, đến Philadelphia, Pennsylvania vào ngày 6 tháng 11. Dent được cho ngừng hoạt động tại đây vào ngày 4 tháng 12 năm 1945, và bị bán để tháo dỡ vào ngày 13 tháng 6 năm 1946.

Dent được tặng thưởng năm Ngôi sao Chiến trận do thành tích phục vụ trong Thế Chiến II.


A Family Matter

The Kennedy family had a personal connection to the issue the president's sister Rosemary, sixteen months his junior, was born with intellectual disabilities.

In 1946, Ambassador and Mrs. Joseph P. Kennedy established the Joseph P. Kennedy Jr. Foundation (in memory of their eldest son) to "seek the prevention of intellectual disabilities by identifying its causes, and to improve the means by which society deals with citizens who have intellectual disabilities." Eunice Kennedy Shriver began directing the foundation in 1957 and became a staunch advocate for people with intellectual disabilities and their families.

At the urging of Eunice Kennedy Shriver, Kennedy made intellectual disabilities a priority for his new administration. Before his inauguration, he created a transition task force. Once in office, he followed its recommendation to establish the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Still in existence today, the institute was charged with conducting and supporting research on intellectual disabilities as well as all aspects of maternal and child health and human development.

Nine months after the inauguration, at a press conference on October 11, 1961, President Kennedy announced his intention to appoint "a panel of outstanding scientists, doctors, and others to prescribe a plan of action in the field" intellectual disabilities. He added, "The central problems of cause and prevention remain unsolved, and I believe that we as a country, in association with scientists all over the world, should make a comprehensive attack." The 27-member panel met with President Kennedy at the White House on October 18, 1961.


Dentistry

Application documents received prior to the date noted below are currently in the initial stage of processing. The timeframe for the review and evaluation of these materials varies. Applications with education from outside the U.S. usually require a lengthier review process. All applicants should allow an additional 6-8 weeks for review after this date before submitting a Contact Us Form to request a status update, as contacting us earlier will delay processing. We cannot provide the status of a licensure application by phone. We thank you for your patience and cooperation.

Profession Currently Reviewing Items Received
Dentists 6/12/2021
Dental Hygienists 5/25/2021
Registered Dental Assistants 6/8/2021

Advisory Notice: For the latest information on COVID-19 issues impacting the licensed professions, including professional exam updates, please visit OP’s COVID-19 website.

Dentists restore and maintain dental health by diagnosing and treating, operating on, or prescribing for any disease, pain, injury, deformity or physical condition of the oral and maxillofacial area. In general, this means the teeth, gums, jaws, and other areas of the head and neck as long as the mouth is involved. Under the supervision of a dentist, dental hygienists provide treatment to prevent cavities and gum diseases.

Dentists and dental hygienists must be licensed by the Board of Regents to practice in New York State. As part of a dental delivery team, only dental hygienists and dentists may perform the following services:

  • apply topical medications and cavity-preventing agents, like sealants, fluorides and topical anesthetic agents to your teeth
  • place and remove periodontal dressings, temporary restorations
  • counsel you on the importance of good nutrition for oral health
  • perform such monitoring procedures as reviewing your health history, taking your blood pressure, and maintaining your dental chart
  • remove tartar (calculus) and plaque from your teeth below and above the gum line
  • polish teeth, including existing restorations
  • teach proper hygiene techniques for your teeth and gums and develop individual at-home oral hygiene programs
  • all services that may be performed by dental assistants

Dental assistants perform a variety of support functions those who elect to become licensed as New York certified dental assistants may also perform these services as part of a dental delivery team under the direct, personal supervision of a dentist:

  • provide patient education
  • take preliminary medical histories and vital signs for review by a dentist
  • place and remove rubber dams, matrix bands, ligature ties and temporary separating devices
  • remove orthodontic arch wires, periodontal dressings, and temporary cement (not including temporary fillings)
  • select and prefit temporary crowns and orthodontic bands
  • take impressions for study casts, diagnostic casts, space maintainers, orthodontic appliances, and occlusal guards (guards that prevent grinding of the teeth)
  • remove stitches placed by a dentist
  • apply topical cavity-preventing and desensitizing agents to the teeth

Dental assistants who do not perform these services do not need a license.


Ulysses Grant Quotes

“The friend in my adversity I shall always cherish most. I can better trust those who have helped to relieve the gloom of my dark hours than those who are so ready to enjoy with me the sunshine of my prosperity.”

“In every battle there comes a time when both sides consider themselves beaten. Then he who continues the attack wins.”

“There are but few important events in the affairs of men brought about by their own choice.”

“The art of war is simple enough. Find out where your enemy is. Get at him as soon as you can. Strike him as hard as you can, and keep moving on.”


Watch the video: Εξαιρετική Ανάλυση: Γιώργος Φίλης - Ναύαρχος Μαρτζούκος συζητούν τα πάντα. (November 2021).